This section contains the knowledge checks, recording forms and a method to receive certificates for Carrier's Lecture Series Seminars 

This section has the Knowledge Check and Certificates for the two seminars held in Chicago at the 2018 ASHRAE Meeting.

Seminar 1 

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 2013 requires eliminating  mechanical cooling at ambient conditions  below 50F DB/45F WB. This seminar describes how to incorporate an integrated waterside economizer into a chilled water system and demonstrate using  modeling tools for proper application of the economizer and optimization of the chiller plant.

Seminar 2 

This seminar will explore the refrigerants available today and look at the current regulations that govern them. A review of the Montreal Protocol, Kyoto Protocol, Kigali Agreement and SNAP will be examined for regulation and phase out impact.  New refrigerant options will be compared for application, safety and ability to retrofit into existing equipment. Timing of how new refrigerants might be included in future building codes will be analyzed.

In this seminar we discuss how weather impacts chiller performance and how a system can be designed to optimize plants for cold condenser water operation. We also review how chiller construction can be used to leverage cold condenser water-associated energy savings.

In this seminar we will compare chiller compression and how load and lift is impacted by each. We will review the results of ASHRAE Research Projects 601 and 751, how to evaluate chiller performance and strategies for staging chiller plants to optimize performance. 

ASHRAE 90.1 requirements have continued to become more stringent with each revision to the standard. The impact on chiller efficiency has led many to believe that little more can be done to improve efficiency of chillers. This presentation looks at how the selection of the type of chiller and taking advantage of its operating envelope as well as the use of a series counterflow piping arrangement can result in over a 50% improvement over the standard.

Some applications such as hospitals and hospitality have a constant need of heating energy even during the hottest days of the year and these same facilities often need to run chillers during the coldest days. Engineers often question of what chiller technology will most efficiently recover what is otherwise wasted energy. This presentation evaluates how screw and centrifugal chiller technology and best be applied to efficiently recover the rejected energy. The best solution depends on part load performance and chiller piping arrangements.  

When properly applied, Waterside Economizer can be a power tool for energy savings in a WSHP system. By utilizing the cold ambient conditions to generate chilled loop temperature, the Waterside Economizer can provide “Free” system cooling. This presentation provides a path to understanding Waterside Economizers for WSHP systems and how to properly apply them for maximum energy savings.

WSHP systems are a widely popular system, due to their flexibility and high efficiency for both cooling and heating. With new advances in technology and design strategies, there are many ways to further enhance WSHP system efficiency. This presentation explores some of those efficiency enhancing concepts, such as waterside economizer, enhanced motor technologies, and utilizing DOAS units.

The piping system used on screw chillers has an impact on their performance. This presentation looks at how the chiller plants hydronic system influences screw chiller operation at part load and why a good turn down ratio is important. Changing condenser water temperatures and varying system load represent a significant opportunity for energy savings but the chiller and the piping system must be designed to take advantage of the saving potential. 

In the current economic environment building owners are more than ever faced with optimizing economic value of the building while maintaining occupant comfort and security. New intelligent buildings not only control energy use and maintain comfort but anticipate occupant needs. This presentation looks at the new trends in intelligent buildings. The use of building automation is described in providing customized comfort conditions, energy use dashboards and even elevator systems that optimize use and minimize occupant wait time. 

A popular system combination is WSHP units with a centralized DOAS system. This presentation identifies methods to enhance the efficiency of WSHP systems and reviews the various reheat systems available for packaged DOAS units.

As Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems (DOAS) have gained in popularity, many different supply air control methods have arisen. Every one of these methods has something in common; a reheat system. This presentation explores the various types of DOAS reheat systems available, such as Hot Gas Reheat, Liquid Subcooling, and Sealed Refrigerant Loops; and describes how to apply reheat systems for various supply air control methods, such as neutral supply air, space sensible load offset,  and space latent load offset.

This presentation looks at tools an engineer can use to determine the most cost and energy effective solution to chiller projects. There is no one solution that is the perfect system for all applications. Things like system load, weather conditions and chiller performance make nearly every project unique. In this presentation the steps of evaluating these various influences on energy and economic performance are evaluated by using a step by step evaluation process.

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1, in its current form, employs
two procedures to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) in buildings.  These are the Ventilation Rate and IAQ Procedures.
This standard further endeavors to achieve the necessary balance between IAQ and energy consumption by specifying minimum ventilation rates and IAQ that will be acceptable to human occupants.

This presentation will focus on the design of Custom DOAS units with respect to providing adequate OA, and considering the IAQ procedure when the reduction of outdoor air pollutants is a concern. A system approach to combining DOAS units with chilled beam technology will be reviewed. Particular focus will be given to this combined strategy’s energy savings potential as it is applied to LEED® EA credits.

This presentation will focus on the design of Custom DOAS units with respect to providing adequate OA, and considering the IAQ procedure when the reduction of outdoor air pollutants is a concern. A system approach to combining DOAS units with chilled beam technology will be reviewed. Particular focus will be given to this combined strategy’s energy savings potential as it is applied to LEED EA credits.

Arriving at the correct ventilation system design for a multiple-zone application using the ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004 (2007) Ventilation Rate Procedure is not a simple task. There are many variables that must be factored into the process some of which include complex equations. The reader should first have an understanding of all the Ventilation Rate Procedure concepts. 

Arriving at the optimized ventilation system design for a multiple-zone application requires further analysis. This may include the ability to utilize load calculation software to evaluate multiple scenarios in order to arrive at the most cost effective quantity of ventilation air while maintaining good indoor air quality for the specific application.

This presentation starts with the often forgotten fundamentals of the fan laws and reading fan curves and demonstrates how the best selection might not be the larger size. Forward curve fans have been the popular choice for years but in recent years the use of plenum fans has become more common. This presentation explores where the use of plenum fans best fit and how to apply them to achieve a cost effective and energy efficient solution. 

Variable Air Volume Packaged Rooftop Heating and Cooling units are often selected for the low first cost and ease of installation and maintenance. By considering various aspects of the unit configuration and system operation, this packaged solution can also provide energy savings.  This presentation identifies a few effective methods for providing energy savings from the VAV RTU, including minimum capacity control, outdoor air intake reset, return air tracking, supply air pressure reset, and supply air temperature reset.

The federal government has mandated that all states bring their state energy codes up to at least the level of ASHRAE 90.1- 2010 by 2013. The 2010 version is a significant improvement (30%) over the 2004 version which used as the benchmark and incorporated over 109 addenda. One of the largest energy uses in a commercial building is the HVAC system so many of these changes have a direct impact on HVAC designers. This workshop will give the HVAC designer a practical evaluation of the 2010 changes and the way they will influence HVAC design. Several practical examples are used and climate specific impacts are highlighted allowing designers to evaluate the impacts of the changes on their designs.

This workshop will explain the advantages of VRF systems for different applications. It will describe the differences in 2 pipe and 3 pipe systems and explain how ASHRAE 15 requirements can be met with VRF systems. In addition, how oil return is accomplished and the various methods of assuring oil return will be explored.

The Montreal Protocol had a major impact on our industry over 20 years ago as it addressed issues of ODP. Today's concerns over GWP now appear to have the potential for similar changes and the choices can be just as dramatic. The US Government continues to push for regulations that will address the GWP issue and refrigerants are often considered in these regulations. You might even have heard that one of the most common refrigerant for chillers in production today is being phased out. Consulting engineers need to know the whole story and understand when and how it might impact their designs.  This seminar will address the choices of refrigerants and the scope of the regulations and codes that impact refrigerant choices for chillers now and in the future.

Controlling airborne contaminants is essential to maintain adequate environmental air quality (EAQ) for museums and archival storage facilities.

Pollutants can originate from the ambient air as well as inside the building itself. Outside sources of contaminants, including vehicular emissions, ozone and gas / particulate release from  industrial facilities, are usual contributors to a museum’s EAQ deficiencies. Emissions from nearby parking garages or residential furnaces can also result in the degradation of priceless artwork or archival material. Inside sources of pollution can include food service areas, cleaning aerosols and bio

effluents from visitors. Whereas film storage vaults can generate their own “vinegar syndrome” and destroy film contained in canisters.

This presentation will outline the current engineering  guidelines used to establish adequate EAQ  in Museums and short or long term archival storage, as well as review the various filtration technologies that can be incorporated into the Museum’s HVAC design.

International Energy Conservation Code 2015 has been adopted in 11 states in the USA as of December 2016. The IECC-2015 code  has a number of new requirements which impacts the application of HVAC equipment and method of compliance with the spec. This seminar examines the new requirements and available methods of compliance.

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 2013 requires eliminating  mechanical cooling at ambient conditions  below 50F DB/45F WB. This seminar describes how to incorporate an integrated waterside economizer into a chilled water system and demonstrate using  modeling tools for proper application of the economizer and optimization of the chiller plant.

This seminar address causes of Low Delta T Syndrome, which causes additional chiller and pump energy to be consumed in order to maintain design load. Several design and operational techniques are examined to minimize Low Delta T Syndrome in chilled water plants.

International Energy Conservation Code 2015 has been adopted in 11 states in the USA as of December 2016. The IECC-2015 code  has a number of new requirements which impacts the application of HVAC equipment and method of compliance with the spec. This seminar is the first of 3 on this topic. This seminar provides an overview of the code and examines the new requirements and available methods of compliance. This seminar look at specific requirements on CW systems.